Meet the Designers Pt. 2: Rooms With a View 2013

Five questions for Lynne Scalo, Dinyar Wadia and Saranda Berisa



Five questions for Lynne Scalo of Lynne Scalo Design

athome: How would you describe your design philosophy?
Lynne Scalo: I’m always thinking about what Leonardo da Vinci said during the sixteenth century about how simplicity is the highest form of satisfaction. I love to have things be elegant and sophisticated, but simple, yet very impactful and artfully presented.

ah: What are some of your favorite pieces in your home?
LS: I’ve had the privilege of working with a lot of women artists, and I have some really cool paintings that people have done for me and given to me as gifts because I was their muse. Those are really special objects to me.

ah: Are there any causes that are close to your heart?
LS: I try to mentor young women, not only within the design field but women who have dreams to do “X,” or open their own company. I want to empower young women to be able to move forward in their businesses.

ah: If given the opportunity who is one person you would love to design a space for?
LS: I would have loved to create an environment for Jean-Michel Basquiat. He was a contemporary artist in the 1980’s and he started with street art and graffiti. I would have liked to translate his work into something that speaks of truth and art.

ah: What interior design elements do you think are timeless?
LS: I will always love sterling silver. It’s always going to be pretty and goes with every environment. Style needs to be synonymous with substance. I think each time period has value—it’s just a matter of being able to decipher.
 

Five questions for Dinyar Wadia and Saranda Berisa of Wadia Associates

athome: What was your first design project?
Saranda Berisa: My first design project was an Upper West Side pre-war building. It was quite a grand home, with wonderful architecture, underpinnings, moldings, and creaky floors that provided a great springboard for my work at that point.

Dinyar Wadia: My first projects were in Bombay, Mumbai. I did two simultaneously: One was a group of residential towers on the Arabian Sea and the other was a bunch of industrial high-rise buildings in the suburbs of Mumbai for the Tata Group.
ah: What are some of your favorite shops for your design projects?

SB: New York City shopping provides a unique venue for furnishings with a bit more edge. When I can’t get in, I certainly take advantage of the antique shops and fabric sources in Stamford. When travel allows, France is the way to go!
ah: What are some of your favorite places to travel?

DW: In Paris, the Villandry is a botanical garden designed by an American woman and a French man. All of the gardens are done with vegetables. I’ve been there three times and every time I go, I am in awe.
ah: What do you do when you’re not designing?
SB: Photography and capturing the outdoors is a big part of my life. I am also pretty athletic, so whether it is running, hiking, or taking advantage of extra airline miles to jet off somewhere fantastic, it’s always movement.

ah: What are some causes that are close to your heart?
SB: I’ve always had a soft spot for charitable work, but animal welfare is paramount in my heart. I spend a lot of my free time dealing with WWF global and local charities. I plan on going to South Africa on a volunteer mission in Zululand to assist with rhino and elephant poaching next year. We have to sustain this earth for generations to come and wildlife is a critical part of our environment.
DW: I support Wounded Warrior and The Smile Train, which is a charity that deals with people who have cleft palates. The other two I like to support are in India, Pratham and Gram Seva. They take orphans and educate them, and education is the most important thing for any country.